Daily Archives: January 19, 2019

Police offer a reward after body dumped next to Peter Mokaba stadium is identified

Polokwane – The Police are offering a reward of up to fifty thousand rands (50 000.00) for any information that can lead to the arrest and subsequent conviction of the suspects responsible for the murder of the victim whose body was on Tuesday 2019-01-15, found dumped next to the new Peter Mokaba Stadium. The discovery was made at around 22h00.

The deceased has been identified as Marks Rambau (48) and was a Deputy Director in the Limpopo Department of Transport. He is from Ha-Masia in the Vhembe District and was currently staying at Ivy Park in Polokwane.

The deceased’s body was allegedly dumped and set alight by what appeared to be a couple driving a blue VW Polo. The partially burned body was found by the police soon after they were summoned by a Security officer on duty at the offices next to the Municipality Park’s Depo, next to the new Peter Mokaba Stadium.

The motive for the killing is unknown at this stage. Anyone with information that can lead to the arrest of the suspects responsible is requested to contact Captain Sekhwela at 0727178344 or Captain Ntini at 0731490140 or may call the toll free number 086001011.

Source: South African Police Service

Police offer a reward after body dumped next to Peter Mokaba stadium is identified

Polokwane – The Police are offering a reward of up to fifty thousand rands (50 000.00) for any information that can lead to the arrest and subsequent conviction of the suspects responsible for the murder of the victim whose body was on Tuesday 2019-01-15, found dumped next to the new Peter Mokaba Stadium. The discovery was made at around 22h00.

The deceased has been identified as Marks Rambau (48) and was a Deputy Director in the Limpopo Department of Transport. He is from Ha-Masia in the Vhembe District and was currently staying at Ivy Park in Polokwane.

The deceased’s body was allegedly dumped and set alight by what appeared to be a couple driving a blue VW Polo. The partially burned body was found by the police soon after they were summoned by a Security officer on duty at the offices next to the Municipality Park’s Depo, next to the new Peter Mokaba Stadium.

The motive for the killing is unknown at this stage. Anyone with information that can lead to the arrest of the suspects responsible is requested to contact Captain Sekhwela at 0727178344 or Captain Ntini at 0731490140 or may call the toll free number 086001011.

Source: South African Police Service

SAUDI ARABIA PLANS OIL REFINERY, PETROCHEMICALS PLANT IN SOUTH AFRICA

PRETORIA, Saudi Arabia plans to build an oil refinery and a petrochemicals plant in South Africa as part of $10 billion of investments in the country, Saudi Energy Minister Khalid Al-Falih said on Friday.

Saudi oil would be used in the planned refinery whose construction would be led by state energy company Saudi Aramco, Al-Falih said in comments following a meeting with South African Energy Minister Jeff Radebe in Pretoria.

There have been exchanges of talks by Saudi Aramco teams and they have been supported by the South African energy ministry, Al-Falih said.

The exact location of the refinery and petrochemicals plant will be finalised in the coming weeks, Radebe said.

Saudi Arabia was also interested in using South Africa’s major oil storage facilities, Al-Falih said, adding that Saudi utility developer Acwa Power was looking at investing in South Africa’s revamped renewable energy program.

He also confirmed that there were discussions about the kingdom investing in South Africa’s state defense company Denel.

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa is trying to woo foreign investors to help revive a struggling economy as he prepares for a parliamentary election this year.

Saudi Prince Mohammed Bin Salman met with Ramaphosa on the sidelines of the Group of 20 summit in Argentina in November.

Source: Nam News Network

Banyana Banyana go down to the Netherlands

Two first half goals by the Netherlands were enough for see them beat Sasol-sponsored Banyana Banyana 2-1 in the inaugural Winnie Mandela International Challenge played on Saturday, 19 January 2019 at the Cape Town Stadium.

Thembi Kgatlana managed to get a consolation goal for the host nation � continuing where she left off in the 2018 Women’s AFCON, where she scored five goals and finished top goal scorer.

This was the first match of the year for both sides, and were using it to kick start preparations for the upcoming FIFA Women’s World Cup in June in France.

Banyana Banyana head coach Desiree Ellis started with the bulk of the team that played the final of the 2018 Women’s AFCON against Nigeria in Ghana � making only one change, with vice captain Refiloe Jane taking the place of Busisiwe Ndimeni, who was not in the match day squad.

Jane missed the final due to club commitments.

The home side was stunned as early as the second minute when Sherida Spitse was given space to shoot, and she made no mistake as she gave the visitors the lead.

While Banyana Banyana was trying to get back into the game, the Netherlands increased their lead in the 19thminute through Vivienne Miedema with a low shot that beat Kaylin Swart in goals.

The South Africans however found their rhythm and were able to match the visitors with play � and were duly rewarded when Kgatlana beat the offside trap in the 33rdminute, rounded off goalkeeper and captain Sari van Veenendaal and reduced the deficit.

This was Kgatlana’s 16thgoal in a Banyana Banyana jersey.

After the break the hosts found some ascendency as they created chances after chances but could not find the back of the net.

Captain Janine van Wyk limped off the field early in the second stanza and was replaced by Noko Matlou in a forced change. Matlou is now two caps shy of 150.

Ellis also made some other changes � handing a new cap to U17 Women’s National Team player Karabo Dhlamini, who replaced Mamello Makhabane in the 62ndminute.

Ten minutes later Australia-based Rhoda Mulaudzi made her return in the Banyana Banyana jersey as she took the place of Kgatlana. Mulaudzi last played for her country in October 2017.

Koketso Tlailane and Nompumelelo Nyandeni also checked in, to replace Linda Motlhalo and Leandra Smeda respectively.

No matter how much the South Africans pushed forward to grab an equaliser, the Netherlands stood firm.

It ended 2-1 to the visitors � who made it three victories in as many matches against Banyana Banyana. The other two defeats came in 2016 � 1-0 and 2-0.

Despite the defeat, it was a much-improved performance from South Africa, and certainly a good start to World Cup preparations.

Banyana Banyana next face Sweden on Tuesday, 22 January 2019 at 19h00, also at the Cape Town Stadium in the Albertina Sisulu Centenary Challenge.

Source: South Africa Football Association

Thousands Worldwide Join Women’s March

Thousands of women gathered in cities in the United States and around the world Saturday for the third annual Women’s March to demand gender equality and call attention to environmental concerns and immigrant rights, among other issues.

At a rally in Washington, just blocks from the White House, march organizer and transgender rights activist Abby Stein told demonstrators they would not be deterred by efforts to divide them.

“A lot of people out there, a lot of people in the media are trying to divide us. What brings us together is not the fact that we are all the same. What brings us together is our differences,” she said.

House of the Lord Churches Executive Minister Leah Daughtry also addressed the Washington crowd, emphasizing the mantra “we can’t stop.”

“We won’t stop until every child is reunited with their parents at the border. We can’t stop. We can’t stop. We won’t stop until every child has free, full access to education. We can’t stop. We won’t stop until everyone has full, free, fair access to health care,” Daughtry said.

The beginning

The first Women’s March was held in 2017, the day after Donald Trump was sworn in as president of the United States.

On Trump’s first full day in office, hundreds of thousands of women descended on Washington in a display of popular opposition to the new administration and its policies. Sister marches were held in more than 600 locations in the U.S. and around the globe in solidarity with the marchers in Washington.

Peter Newsham, Washington’s interim police chief at the time, said of the march in the U.S. capital, The crowd stretches so far that there’s no room left to march.

Many marchers wore the knitted pink hats that have become a symbol of women’s anti-Trump sentiments.

Moment to movement

In 2018, organizers of the Women’s March sought to build on the first rally by focusing on politics and the power of women voters. They based the second march in Nevada, a battleground state for the midterm elections later in the year. The rally touting the message Power to the Polls focused on voter registration, featuring activists and members of Congress as speakers.

As in 2017, sister marches were held in cities across the U.S. and thousands of women also marched in London, Paris, Sydney and other European and Australian cities.

In 2019, the organizers brought the march back to Washington. Hopes were high for this year’s turnout, especially after a record 102 women were elected to the House of Representatives in the midterms at the end of last year.

A growing controversy

Several prominent women’s and civil rights organization were absent from the list of partners published on the Women’s March website.

Among those that had partnered with the group in the past, but missing in 2019, were civil rights organization Southern Poverty Law Center and the political action committee Emily’s List. By late Tuesday, the Democratic National Committee had also withdrawn its name from the list of partners.

The controversy surrounds several Women’s March leaders who have been accused of holding racist and anti-Semitic views.

Organizers have repeatedly denied all accusations of misconduct or using inappropriate speech.

The issue resurfaced when two of the march’s organizers appeared on the ABC talk show The View on Monday and refused to denounce Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan, who has made repeated anti-Semitic and anti-white remarks.

When asked why she had posted a photo of Farrakhan on Instagram with a caption that included the hashtag for the title Greatest of All Time, Women’s March’s co-president Tamika Mallory said, I didn’t call him the greatest of all time because of his rhetoric. I called him the greatest of all time because of what he’s done in black communities.

Mallory’s co-president, Bob Bland, denied allegations printed in The New York Times and the Jewish magazine Tablet that members of the organization had expressed anti-Semitic beliefs at a meeting behind closed doors.

The people that the journalist spoke to did not tell the truth, period, full stop, Bland said. The Women’s March unequivocally condemns anti-Semitism, bigotry, transphobia. … We condemn any statements of hate.

Going forward

Some marchgoers said they weren’t deterred.

“The controversy has certainly influenced conversations around my decision to attend or not. Though it never was going to stop me, even more so I feel it’s important to attend,” said Naomi Zipursky of San Francisco, who was to attend the local march there Saturday.

By not showing up, I don’t even allow the conversation to begin and only create a bigger gap.

The thought that I, as a Jewish woman, wouldn’t be welcome or would need to leave part of my identity at the door in order to attend the march is disheartening and, frankly, alienating, Zipursky said. [But] I also believe that what one person may say or do doesn’t necessarily represent what an entire organization may stand for.

A separate March for ALL Women was planned for Saturday in the U.S. capital, with organizers rallying those who may feel the main march is divisive and not inclusive.

Many participants didn’t think the marches would ever compare to the first one.

It’s going to be very hard to pull off the momentum of the first women’s march, said Mary Tablante, communications officer at the Asian Americans Advancing Justice. I am still going [this year] because I do think they are trying to improve it. There’s still a lot of work to be done in the movement.

Despite the controversy, marches were planned in almost every U.S. state. ABC News reported some states would hold multiple marches: California planned to have more than 30 marches, New York 15, Texas, 13 and Florida 11. Michigan was to host eight and Pennsylvania seven.

Marches also were planned in more than a dozen European nations, as well as in Canada, Mexico, Australia, New Zealand, Indonesia, Pakistan, Israel, Nigeria, Uganda, Zambia and South Africa, among others.

Source: Voice of America