Daily Archives: January 18, 2019

The National Commissioner welcomes the speedy arrest of four alleged Tsakane School robbers

Pretoria: The National Police Commissioner, General Khehla John Sitole has welcomed the arrest of four alleged robbers and the recovery of 22 tablets and three laptops which are the ones suspected to have been stolen from Menzi Primary School in Tsakane on 13 January 2019.

Less than 48 hours ago General Sitole assured the nation during an interview with Power FM that he will instruct the police in Gauteng to mobilise the 72 hour Activation Plan. A Plan which entails the mobilisation of critical resources including Crime Intelligence, Forensic Experts, the Hawks and seasoned investigators from the SAPS Detective Services.

As in most cases of the mobilisation, this plan has borne fruit within 48 hours.

The team was led by Crime Intelligence to Johannesburg CBD where four suspects aged between 23 and 38 were arrested. During the arrest police recovered 22 tablets and three laptops believed to have been stolen from the school during the business robbery.

The National Commissioner has also applauded the team for the arrest of the suspects that want to rob the children of Tsakane of education and a bright future. “This should serve as a warning to other potential criminals that, as police, we will not rest until we are sure that justice prevails”, said General Sitole.

“As a nation we, as law-abiding citizens, should rally together against such criminality which is infiltrating and disrupting our education system which, fundamentally is essential for development of a sustainable Grand Economic Strategy for South Africa,” added General Sitole.

The suspects will appear in Tsakane Magistrates Court on Monday, 21 January 2019. Members of the community are urged to report any criminality to crime stop at 0860010111 where any information received will be treated with the strictest anonymity.

Source: South African Police Service

Indigenous Peoples Stage Solidarity March on Washington

WASHINGTON U.S. political leaders and the media have ignored us long enough.

That’s the message thousands of international indigenous activists will be bringing to Washington Friday for the first ever Indigenous Peoples March. They are seeking to bring national attention to injustices endured by Indigenous people across the globe.

The event, coming a day before the third annual Women’s March, is organized by the Indigenous Peoples Movement (IPM), an international grassroots collective seeking to unify tribes and indigenous peoples from North, South and Central America, the Pacific, Asia, Africa and the Caribbean.

Our main goal is to send a message that we are still here, we are organized, and we are growing, said IPM media coordinator Darren Thompson, an Ojibwe and member of the Lac du Flambeau tribe in Wisconsin. We are looking not only to empower each other but share important information with the American public about the legacy of colonization.

As many as 80 speakers and indigenous performers will participate in the event, which is hash tagged #IPMDC19 on social media. They include Rep. Deb Haaland (D-N.M.), a member of the Laguna Pueblo and one of the first two Native American women elected to the U.S. Congress, and Ruth Buffalo, recently elected first Native American Democrat to the North Dakota Legislature.

Also speaking will be Ashley Callingbull, a Cree First Nations woman from the Enoch Cree Nation in the province of Alberta, Canada, and a former Miss Universe who works to empower indigenous youth through relating stories of her own experiences with physical and sexual abuse.

They will address a wide range of issues and injustices impacting indigenous communities, including the environment, voter suppression, police brutality and a global epidemic of missing and murdered indigenous women (MMIW).

Historic marginalization and racism, the legacies of colonization, have left indigenous women particularly vulnerable to violence. Statistics are hard to come by, owing to spotty reporting by victims and police. The U.S. Justice Department (DOJ) reports that 84 percent of Native American and Alaska Native (NA/AN) women have experienced violence in their lives, and more than half of them are survivors of sexual violence. Ninety-six percent of victims of rape or sexual assault are attacked by non-native assailants, and NA/AN women in the United States are murdered at a rate ten times higher than the national average.

In this July 14, 2018, file photo, Kenny Still Smoking touches the tombstone of his 7-year-old daughter, Monica, who disappeared from school in 1979 and was found frozen on a mountain, as he visits her grave on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Browning

In this July 14, 2018, file photo, Kenny Still Smoking touches the tombstone of his 7-year-old daughter, Monica, who disappeared from school in 1979 and was found frozen on a mountain, as he visits her grave on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Browning

In addition, a 2015 National Congress of American Indians study of four sites in the U.S. and Canada found that about 40 percent of women involved in sex trafficking identified as an AI/AN or First Nation from Canada.

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz (Igorot, from the Philippines), reported in 2015 that indigenous women worldwide are vulnerable to rape, enslavement or murder, particularly during military conflicts.

IPM organizers say they are looking to advocate policies to strengthen indigenous rights and to encourage solidarity among global indigenous groups across borders imposed by European colonizers.

They expect to draw a crowd of 10,000 from as far away as Australia, Guatemala, Papua New Guinea, and the Caribbean.

Though since we are piggybacking on the Women’s March on Saturday, that number could be much, much higher, said Thompson.

Source: Voice of America

Indigenous Peoples Stage Solidarity March on Washington

WASHINGTON U.S. political leaders and the media have ignored us long enough.

That’s the message thousands of international indigenous activists will be bringing to Washington Friday for the first ever Indigenous Peoples March. They are seeking to bring national attention to injustices endured by Indigenous people across the globe.

The event, coming a day before the third annual Women’s March, is organized by the Indigenous Peoples Movement (IPM), an international grassroots collective seeking to unify tribes and indigenous peoples from North, South and Central America, the Pacific, Asia, Africa and the Caribbean.

Our main goal is to send a message that we are still here, we are organized, and we are growing, said IPM media coordinator Darren Thompson, an Ojibwe and member of the Lac du Flambeau tribe in Wisconsin. We are looking not only to empower each other but share important information with the American public about the legacy of colonization.

As many as 80 speakers and indigenous performers will participate in the event, which is hash tagged #IPMDC19 on social media. They include Rep. Deb Haaland (D-N.M.), a member of the Laguna Pueblo and one of the first two Native American women elected to the U.S. Congress, and Ruth Buffalo, recently elected first Native American Democrat to the North Dakota Legislature.

Also speaking will be Ashley Callingbull, a Cree First Nations woman from the Enoch Cree Nation in the province of Alberta, Canada, and a former Miss Universe who works to empower indigenous youth through relating stories of her own experiences with physical and sexual abuse.

They will address a wide range of issues and injustices impacting indigenous communities, including the environment, voter suppression, police brutality and a global epidemic of missing and murdered indigenous women (MMIW).

Historic marginalization and racism, the legacies of colonization, have left indigenous women particularly vulnerable to violence. Statistics are hard to come by, owing to spotty reporting by victims and police. The U.S. Justice Department (DOJ) reports that 84 percent of Native American and Alaska Native (NA/AN) women have experienced violence in their lives, and more than half of them are survivors of sexual violence. Ninety-six percent of victims of rape or sexual assault are attacked by non-native assailants, and NA/AN women in the United States are murdered at a rate ten times higher than the national average.

In this July 14, 2018, file photo, Kenny Still Smoking touches the tombstone of his 7-year-old daughter, Monica, who disappeared from school in 1979 and was found frozen on a mountain, as he visits her grave on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Browning

In this July 14, 2018, file photo, Kenny Still Smoking touches the tombstone of his 7-year-old daughter, Monica, who disappeared from school in 1979 and was found frozen on a mountain, as he visits her grave on the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Browning

In addition, a 2015 National Congress of American Indians study of four sites in the U.S. and Canada found that about 40 percent of women involved in sex trafficking identified as an AI/AN or First Nation from Canada.

The United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, Victoria Tauli-Corpuz (Igorot, from the Philippines), reported in 2015 that indigenous women worldwide are vulnerable to rape, enslavement or murder, particularly during military conflicts.

IPM organizers say they are looking to advocate policies to strengthen indigenous rights and to encourage solidarity among global indigenous groups across borders imposed by European colonizers.

They expect to draw a crowd of 10,000 from as far away as Australia, Guatemala, Papua New Guinea, and the Caribbean.

Though since we are piggybacking on the Women’s March on Saturday, that number could be much, much higher, said Thompson.

Source: Voice of America

Housebreaking suspects arrested

Port Elizabeth: Mount Road police members arrested three alleged housebreaking suspects minutes after a business premises in North End was broken into.

It is alleged that at about 00:40 on 18/01, members received information of two suspicious males pushing two trolleys in Robert Street in Central. While driving, they were stopped by the complainant who informed them that the business premises in Bressel Street was broken into. The complainant accompanied the police to look for the suspicious persons.

Two males were found pushing the trolleys. Vehicle batteries (15), various types of vehicle oils and other accessories were found in the trolleys. The complainant identified the items as those belonging to the business. While still busy with the alleged suspects, another male was seen walking towards them. He was also arrested.

The three males aged between 24 and 32 were detained for housebreaking and possession of suspected stolen property.

They are expected to appear in court soon.

Source: South African Police Service

Housebreaking suspects arrested

Port Elizabeth: Mount Road police members arrested three alleged housebreaking suspects minutes after a business premises in North End was broken into.

It is alleged that at about 00:40 on 18/01, members received information of two suspicious males pushing two trolleys in Robert Street in Central. While driving, they were stopped by the complainant who informed them that the business premises in Bressel Street was broken into. The complainant accompanied the police to look for the suspicious persons.

Two males were found pushing the trolleys. Vehicle batteries (15), various types of vehicle oils and other accessories were found in the trolleys. The complainant identified the items as those belonging to the business. While still busy with the alleged suspects, another male was seen walking towards them. He was also arrested.

The three males aged between 24 and 32 were detained for housebreaking and possession of suspected stolen property.

They are expected to appear in court soon.

Source: South African Police Service