Daily Archives: July 10, 2017

Basic Education conducts training for Grade 12 maths and physical science teachers in Durban, 10-15 Jul

Department of Basic Education to conduct NSC support training for Grade 12 maths and physical science teachers in Durban

Department of Basic Education will conduct National Senior Certificate (NSC) Support Training for the Grade 12 Mathematics and Physical Science teachers in the Illembe District in Kwazulu Natal. The training will take place from today 10 July to Saturday 15 July 2017 at the Protea Edward Hotel in Durban.

This training initiative is a partnership between the department and Statistics South Africa (StatsSA), who will train teachers on statistics and the Vodacom Foundation will provide tra9ining on Paper video. The Centre for the Advancement of Science and Mathematics Education (CASME) will provide the training programme.

The programme, which started last year, is aimed addressing teacher capacity which in turn influences learner performance at the NSC. There is evidence of improvements in the 2016 results and it I envisaged that the two sessions held to date will should show even bigger improvement in the 2017 NSC results.

Source: Government of South Africa

SA signs Tripartite Free Trade Area agreement

Pretoria – South Africa has become the 19th country to sign an agreement establishing the Tripartite Free Trade Area (TFTA).

Signed on Friday, the TFTA represents an integrated market of 26 countries with a combined population of 625 million people and a total gross domestic product (GDP) of $1.6 trillion.

South Africa signed the agreement in Kampala, Uganda, during the meeting of the Tripartite Sectoral Ministers’ Committee.

The TFTA was launched by the Heads of States in Sharm el-Shaik, Egypt, in June 2015 and South Africa did not sign the agreement at that stage since there was outstanding work in some of the annexures to the agreement.

All the annexures have been completed and adopted by the tripartite Sectoral Ministers Committee, enabling South Africa to sign the agreement. South Africa is 19th country to sign the agreement, said the Department of Trade and Industry (dti).

The agreement will enter into force once 14 countries submit their instruments of ratification. Egypt recently became the first country to ratify the agreement.

Once the agreement enters into force, it will reduce the tariffs on goods traded between the tripartite countries and create new opportunities for exports as well as regional value chains.

Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies, who attended the Sectoral Ministers Committee meeting, said the TFTA is an important initiative in accelerating regional integration efforts to ensure that African countries trade with each other.

South Africa, the Minister said, has been a champion of the tripartite process from the beginning and it has committed to the process.

Minister Davies said the country is pleased to be in a position to sign the agreement. He said while the outstanding annexures were being finalised, South Africa, as part of Southern African Customs Union (SACU), participated in the negotiations to finalise the bilateral tariffs commitments.

Tariff negotiations between SACU and Eastern Africa Community (EAC) are very near to conclusion.

The conclusion of these negotiations will be another important step forward in the process, since it will provide commercial benefits to our business people by enabling them to trade products between SACU and EAC countries at a reduced or zero tariff, said Minister Davies.

The meeting was attended by Trade Ministers and officials from the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA), East African Community (EAC), and Southern African Development Community (SADC).

Source: South African Government News Agency

SA signs Tripartite Free Trade Area agreement

Pretoria – South Africa has become the 19th country to sign an agreement establishing the Tripartite Free Trade Area (TFTA).

Signed on Friday, the TFTA represents an integrated market of 26 countries with a combined population of 625 million people and a total gross domestic product (GDP) of $1.6 trillion.

South Africa signed the agreement in Kampala, Uganda, during the meeting of the Tripartite Sectoral Ministers’ Committee.

The TFTA was launched by the Heads of States in Sharm el-Shaik, Egypt, in June 2015 and South Africa did not sign the agreement at that stage since there was outstanding work in some of the annexures to the agreement.

All the annexures have been completed and adopted by the tripartite Sectoral Ministers Committee, enabling South Africa to sign the agreement. South Africa is 19th country to sign the agreement, said the Department of Trade and Industry (dti).

The agreement will enter into force once 14 countries submit their instruments of ratification. Egypt recently became the first country to ratify the agreement.

Once the agreement enters into force, it will reduce the tariffs on goods traded between the tripartite countries and create new opportunities for exports as well as regional value chains.

Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies, who attended the Sectoral Ministers Committee meeting, said the TFTA is an important initiative in accelerating regional integration efforts to ensure that African countries trade with each other.

South Africa, the Minister said, has been a champion of the tripartite process from the beginning and it has committed to the process.

Minister Davies said the country is pleased to be in a position to sign the agreement. He said while the outstanding annexures were being finalised, South Africa, as part of Southern African Customs Union (SACU), participated in the negotiations to finalise the bilateral tariffs commitments.

Tariff negotiations between SACU and Eastern Africa Community (EAC) are very near to conclusion.

The conclusion of these negotiations will be another important step forward in the process, since it will provide commercial benefits to our business people by enabling them to trade products between SACU and EAC countries at a reduced or zero tariff, said Minister Davies.

The meeting was attended by Trade Ministers and officials from the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA), East African Community (EAC), and Southern African Development Community (SADC).

Source: South African Government News Agency

SA signs Tripartite Free Trade Area agreement

Pretoria – South Africa has become the 19th country to sign an agreement establishing the Tripartite Free Trade Area (TFTA).

Signed on Friday, the TFTA represents an integrated market of 26 countries with a combined population of 625 million people and a total gross domestic product (GDP) of $1.6 trillion.

South Africa signed the agreement in Kampala, Uganda, during the meeting of the Tripartite Sectoral Ministers’ Committee.

The TFTA was launched by the Heads of States in Sharm el-Shaik, Egypt, in June 2015 and South Africa did not sign the agreement at that stage since there was outstanding work in some of the annexures to the agreement.

All the annexures have been completed and adopted by the tripartite Sectoral Ministers Committee, enabling South Africa to sign the agreement. South Africa is 19th country to sign the agreement, said the Department of Trade and Industry (dti).

The agreement will enter into force once 14 countries submit their instruments of ratification. Egypt recently became the first country to ratify the agreement.

Once the agreement enters into force, it will reduce the tariffs on goods traded between the tripartite countries and create new opportunities for exports as well as regional value chains.

Trade and Industry Minister Rob Davies, who attended the Sectoral Ministers Committee meeting, said the TFTA is an important initiative in accelerating regional integration efforts to ensure that African countries trade with each other.

South Africa, the Minister said, has been a champion of the tripartite process from the beginning and it has committed to the process.

Minister Davies said the country is pleased to be in a position to sign the agreement. He said while the outstanding annexures were being finalised, South Africa, as part of Southern African Customs Union (SACU), participated in the negotiations to finalise the bilateral tariffs commitments.

Tariff negotiations between SACU and Eastern Africa Community (EAC) are very near to conclusion.

The conclusion of these negotiations will be another important step forward in the process, since it will provide commercial benefits to our business people by enabling them to trade products between SACU and EAC countries at a reduced or zero tariff, said Minister Davies.

The meeting was attended by Trade Ministers and officials from the Common Market for Eastern and Southern Africa (COMESA), East African Community (EAC), and Southern African Development Community (SADC).

Source: South African Government News Agency

Tanzania’s President Signs New Mining Bills into Law

DAR ES SALAAM ´┐Ż Tanzanian President John Magufuli said on Monday he has signed into law new mining bills which require the government to own at least a 16 percent stake in mining projects.

The laws, which also increase royalties tax on gold and other minerals, were passed by parliament last week despite opposition from the mining industry body.

Magufuli reiterated on Monday that no new mining licenses would be issued until Tanzania “puts things in order” and that the government would review all existing mining licenses with foreign investors.

“We must benefit from our God-given minerals and that is why we must safeguard our natural resource wealth to ensure we do not end up with empty mining pits,” Magufuli told a rally in his home village in Chato district, northwestern Tanzania.

The president has sent shock-waves through the mining community with a series of actions since his election in 2015, which he says are aimed at distributing revenue to the Tanzanian people.

The new mining laws, which were fast-tracked through parliament, raise royalties tax for gold, copper, silver and platinum exports to six percent from four percent.

They also give the government the right to tear up and renegotiate contracts for natural resources like gas or minerals, and remove the right to international arbitration.

“I would like to thank parliament for making the legislative changes. I signed the bills into law the same day Parliament concluded its session on July 5,” Magufuli said.

Passage of the new legislation also followed months of wrangling between the government and the country’s biggest gold miner, London-listed Acacia Mining Plc, over mining contracts after Magufuli decided in March to ban exports of gold and copper concentrates to push for the construction of a domestic mineral smelter.

Magufuli said on Monday that talks between Tanzania and Barrick Gold Corp., Acacia’s majority owner, would begin in two days to try to resolve allegations of tax evasion against Acacia.

Tanzania accused Acacia of tax evasion in 2016 in a case that is ongoing.

Acacia, which denies all allegations, said on July 4 it was seeking an adjudicator to resolve its dispute with the Tanzanian government.

Tanzania is also pushing for the mandatory listing of mining companies on the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange (DSE) by August as part of measures aimed at increasing transparency and spreading wealth from the country’s natural resources.

Other major foreign-owned mining companies in Tanzania include AngloGold Ashanti and Petra Diamonds.

Source: Voice of America